In Solidarity with Abahlalibase Mjondolo (AbM) 5: On Christmas Day, but it could be any day

Reading about what has happened at Kennedy Road Settlement in Durban makes me wonder. More like wondering and wandering from society to society, from places in history and geography. Has capitalism become the greatest laundering scheme, the greatest organized gang?Watch Full Movie Online Streaming Online and Download?

Going back to some of the most predatory roots of capitalism, one finds children split from their families by the slave hunters. That was the beginning of the splitting of humanity. A splitting apart long before Chinua Achebe saw it with the arrival of the colonizers in Things Fall Apart. In spite of the endless onslaught, healing has been going on, more often than not unseen, unheard of among the pharisaic promoters/distributors of pacifying rewards.

Healers are always close by if one can see/hear/feel them
Spirit, breath, pen is all it takes
Ayi Kwei Armah helps those without go to
Healers in forests, healers in deserts,
They are everywhere
HealersbaseMjondolo
same as
AbahlalibaseMjondolo

Is it true, so goes one story,
That abahlali can turn up in your bank
Dry up your account?
Make the owner feel how it feels to be without money
In a land of honey
For the Richest of the richest
Who make money
Out of nothingest
Have decided to get rid of Abahlali
Before they desertify their bank accounts

For centuries the splitting went on
cooked in history books through
names always chosen by the same chefs:
Slavery, abolition, enlightenment, civilization
Capitalism, progress, Christianity,
Colonialism, apartheid, peace, development, competition, globalization, terror
some of these names were once sorted out by one of the greatest chefs of all, under the name la grammaire des civilisations (later, in 1994, translated in English as A History of Civilizations).

La grammaire des civilisations does not mention the splitting of humanity
despite the genocidal sequences of the 20th century whose names have not been forgotten, but are fading fast…just like humanity:
Herrero, Armenians, Congo Free State, Nankin, Holocaust, Hiroshima/Nagasaki, Indochina, Rwanda, DRCongo.

In the eastern part of DRCongo:
Violence, rape against women, babies
followed by unthinkable atrocities.
Committed just for the sake of might is right always.

And so, now, in the hearts, veins and brains of the land of Sobukwe, Biko, Madiba,
Splitting of humanity has been taken to a new level
reminiscent of darker and darkest times

Questions arise:
Germany in 1933? Kolyma/gulag tales?
Nankin? Kassinga? My Lai?
Hiroshima/Nagasaki by other means?

Questions arise:
For what?
In the name of what?

In the name of the richest of the richest
At Kennedy Road/Durban
The answers came:

Showing the poorest of the poor
They are nothing unless they submit
To the most powerful, the most brutal
If they do not submit
They shall be silenced
Forever if necessary

Healing, once said S’bu Zikode,
Is more powerful than any lethal force.
Is the GAH (Gang against healing)
Trying to prove all of the AbahlalibaseMjondolo wrong
AbM is like a young baby, born in 2005
Being raped till it submits to might is right

Questions arise
Will the sun still rise?
We had been promised a new dawn
quickly
Re-baptized renaissance
Quickly evaporated
Has everything been inverted?
Will the sun still rise in the East?
Is the West willing to set?

Accelerated, from splitting to the next stage
With the help of the nuclear mentality
Reducing humanity to dust
Hoping that healers
Shall be pulverized in the process.

Questions arise:
Where is the world headed for when
Apartheid has been relayed by former victims
To make it sweater on the
Richest of the Richest
and harsher on the
Poorest of the Poorest?

Questions cannot be silenced:
Could it be that splitting has now entered its most lethal phase
Gone beyond the point of no return
Saying no to Reconnecting with the Disconnected
As called for by Ayi Kwei Armah
In his Eloquence of the Scribes?

Keep listening
To answers coming
From the quiet ones
Keep listening to
Abahlali relaying
The silenced ones

These words almost did not see the light of day
It moved out of sight on October 18 2009
With apologies
Salvador, Bahia, Brazil, December 25, 2009

US Company Helps Fuel Congo War: UN Report

Thursday 03 December 2009Watch Full Movie Online Streaming Online and Download

Both sides of Congo war get funds from sale of minerals used in mobile phones.

A Nevada-based company’s purchase of minerals looted from eastern Congo is helping to finance a decade-long war that has claimed the lives of millions of civilians, an unpublished United Nations report claims.

Niotan Inc., of Mound House, Nev., is the first American company to be identified as a buyer of conflict minerals from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). It is one of several companies cited in the U.N. study on how the illegal trade of the region’s vast mineral resources, including gold, has kept the war going by enriching both rebels and Congolese army units.

Many of the rare minerals are needed to make mobile phones and other consumer electronic devices.

Also benefiting from the looted minerals are businessmen in Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi and the United Arab Emirates, as well as weapons suppliers from Sudan and North Korea, whose arms are purchased by rebels with the proceeds of the illegal mineral sales in violation of a U.N. arms embargo, the report says.

But companies far from the war zone, like Niotan in Nevada, are profiting, too, the report says. Mobile phones and gold jewelry sold in the U.S. may well have helped finance a war in which at least 200,000 women have been raped, according to U.N. statistics.

The U.N. report, which GlobalPost has obtained, says Niotan buys and sells the mineral coltan, used to make electrolytic capacitors for mobile phones and personal computers. The report details a four-step process by which the minerals move from the killing hills of eastern Congo to American electronics manufacturers.

(Read more about the supply chain by which minerals become the cell phones. Also, watch the video below about what life is like for a freelance miner in Congo.)

The damning report is expected to be officially published in about two weeks. It is being translated now into the U.N.’s five official languages. On Monday the Security Council voted to extend sanctions on individuals and groups in Congo that are selling the minerals but the U.N. has not yet extended the punitive measures to buyers.

The report says that Niotan buys from three war-zone suppliers — Chinese-run Huaying Trading Company (HTC), Bukavu-based World Mining Company (WMC) and Etablissement Muyeye, one of the biggest minerals trading houses in Bukavu. These groups get their minerals from areas of South Kivu province controlled by the FDLR rebel group, the report says.

HTC, WMC and Muyeye sell their minerals to Hong Kong-based African Ventures Ltd., run by John Crawley, director of Nevada-based Niotan. Crawley did not return a call seeking comment. The report said Crawley initially told U.N. investigators that he had little knowledge of African Ventures, before admitting that his father had set it up in 2005.

A second company run by Crawley, Refractory Metals Mining Company Ltd. (RMMC), originally named Niotan Ltd., is located on Shing Wan Road in Hong Kong, the same street as African Ventures. Refractory Metals ships the minerals to Niotan in Nevada, according to a separate investigation by the advocacy group Enough, which runs an anti-genocide project at the Center for American Progress.

Niotan imported 31.8 tons of tantalum ore from Refractory Metals in 2009, according to shipping records obtained by Enough, one dated as late as Oct. 31. Niotan is a “significant supplier of tantalum powder” derived from the coltan for the U.S. electronics industry, Enough said.

Niotan Inc. is a private company that employs from five to nine people in Mound House, Nev., and has annual estimated revenues of $5 million to $10 million, according to Hoover’s Business Directory.

Refractory Metals also supplies coltan to Thailand Smelting and Refining Company Ltd. (Thaisarco), owned by Amalgamated Metal Corporation (AMC) of the U.K. After significant pressure from advocacy groups, AMC said in September that it would discontinue importing minerals from the DRC after its present contracts run out.

John Prendergast, co-founder of Enough, called for the imposition of sanctions “on those that have been named in the U.N. experts report” and he urged the U.N. to take “tangible steps to exclude conflict minerals from the supply chains of electronics and jewelry products.” (Read an opinion piece by Prendergast.)

In extending its sanctions for another year this week, the U.N. Security Council said in a resolution that it was up to governments to police their own companies. The resolution did not name any companies or governments, as the report does. But it does set up guidelines for governments to follow to police their own companies.

U.N. member nations are asked to “ensure importers, processing industries and consumers of Congolese mineral products under their jurisdiction exercise due diligence on their suppliers and on the origin of the minerals they purchase.”

Nations are to turn over to the U.N. details of their licensing requirements and national legislation and to regularly publish import and export statistics for gold, cassiterite, coltan and wolframite. The resolution asks countries to give technical help to the DRC’s mining industry, law enforcement and border control.

David Sullivan, a researcher at Enough, said companies continue to buy conflict minerals because they are about half the price as elsewhere in the world. He said eastern Congo provides about 10 to 25 percent of the world’s supply of tantalum made from coltan.

Susan Rice, the U.S. ambassador to the U.N., told reporters the U.S. would work with the U.N. to “prevent the continued illegal exploitation of Congo’s minerals, including its gold, which is funding the rebels and the fighting in Congo.”

But Rice did not specifically say what the U.S. planned to do to stop companies like Niotan from buying conflict minerals.

“It is a more complicated task than, for example, the Kimberly Process with diamonds, where diamonds are obviously very readily identifiable by their source of origin,” she said. The Kimberly Process has been an international effort since 2003 to curb the export of diamonds that have fueled several West African conflicts.

“We will continue to work … from the context of our policy in the region to look for opportunities to constrain that trade,” Rice said. Earlier this month the Conflict Minerals Trade Act of 2009 was introduced in the House of Representatives aimed at ending the trade in these minerals from the DRC.

The Congo war began after remnants of the Hutu militia that perpetrated 1994 genocide in Rwanda fled over the border into the eastern part of the Democratic Republic of Congo. Uganda and Rwanda invaded eastern Congo to pursue them.

The war has largely devolved over the past decade into a free-for-all for gold and other minerals, with renegade army units selling arms to rebels who both employ violence and massacres to maintain the instability in which the illegal trade thrives.

When life was simple -TAFAWA BALEWA

SIR ABUBAKAR TAFAWA TOOK HIS ONLY ANNUAL LEAVE IN 1963 WHICH HE DECIDED TO SPEND IN HIS VILLAGE.
A BRITISH PHOTO JOURNALIST CAME CALLING, BUT WAS TOLD THE PM IS ON VACATION. HE ASKED TO WHICH COUNTRY, BUT WAS SHOCKED TO HEAR HIS VILLAGE.
ON GETTING TO THE VILLAGE, THERE WAS NO EVIDENCE OR PARAPHENLIA TO SHOW A BIG MAN WAS THERE, EVERYONE WAS BUSY WITH THEIR CHORES.
HE MET A FARMER WITH HIS DONKEY CARRYING BALES OF SUGARCANE, FOR THE PMS HOME, AND HE WAS UTTERLY SPEECHLESS WHEN THE FARMER SAID, I JUST LEFT HIM, YOU WILL SEE HIM SITTING ON BARE FLOOR WITH HIS KIDS DRINKING SUGAR CANE THAT I GAVE THEM. HE MET THEM LIKE THAT AND TOOK THIS PIX — (http://www.nairaland.com/nigeria/topic-365780.0.html). WHAT AN EPITOME OF SIMPLICITY AND HUMILITY….”

Along the same lines this quote from Nelson Mandela’s Autobiography ‘Long Walk to Freedom’: “We arrived in Dar es Salaam the next day and I met Julius Nyerere, the newly independent country’s first president. We talked at his house, which was not at all grand, and recall that he drove himself in a simple car, a little Austin. This impressed me, for it suggested that he was a man of the people. Class, Nyerere always insisted, was alien to Africa; socialism indigenous ” (page 245).